Beadlet Anemones - Species Spotlight

Beadlet anemone open

When we think of sea anemones, it may conjure up images of tropical warm waters and coral reefs. However you don’t have to travel far to spot one of these amazing animals.

We have anemones within our coastal waters. In fact the beadlet anemone is a common sight along our coastlines.  So look out for them on our Big Rockpool Ramble this July.

What to look for

Your first introduction to beadlet anemones may be out of the water as dark red jelly-like blobs (however they may also be orange or green) attached to rocks around the low tide mark. 

Beadlet anemone closed

Beadlet anemone closed

Beadlets have squat bodies with a wide base acting like a sucker, attaching them to rocks along the shore. Yet it’s when the tide comes in and a beadlet anemone is submerged underwater, that the magic truly begins. You will then be mesmerised by the beadlet anemones short, thick stinging tentacles swaying in the current.  

Beadlet anemone open

Beadlet anemone open

Predators of the rocky shore 

A relative to the jellyfish, beadlet anemones are true predators. They use their stinging tentacles to catch passing prey, such as shrimps, crabs or even small fish.  

Beadlet anemones are also highly territorial. Keep a close eye out for the ring of beautiful blue beads beneath a beadlets tentacles,called acrorhagi. These are packed full of stinging cells and are used to fight off other anemones and defend their preferred patch, reminding us to never underestimate the smaller creatures of our shore. 

The Big Rockpool Ramble Guide & Downloads are FREE!

But by making a donation, however large or small, you are contributing to our marine conservation work across Northern Ireland.
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